Summer!

May 27th, 2017

Summer is in full swing…hope you are having a great Memorial Day weekend!

5:00 am  Good Morning!

5:00 am Good Morning!

Happy New Year!

December 30th, 2016

Sunrise

Victorian Christmas is here!

December 3rd, 2016

Leavenworth Small Towns Christmas

Nevada City Victorian Christmas 2016
Sundays – Dec 4, 11, 18 from 1:30-6pm

Wednesdays – Dec 14 & 21 5-9pm

“The enticing aromas of roasted chestnuts and hearty holiday foods fill the air, along with cries of street vendors hawking their wares and lamp-lit streets filled to overflowing with authentic Christmas treasures — hand-crafted candy, jewelry, pottery, perfume, dolls, and over 100 different items in all. It’s the one & only Victorian Christmas-full of new shows, sights, sounds and attractions.

Welcome the holiday season in style in historic Nevada City, a quaint, Gold Rush town nestled in the foothills of the snow-capped Sierra where each year the town’s picturesque downtown transforms into a genuine Christmas card come to life. It’s a magical setting of hilly streets outlined with twinkling white lights and authentic gas lamps, wandering minstrels and carolers dressed in Victorian attire, and a myriad of visitors sharing holiday cheer and good tidings.

This annual, family tradition takes place 2 Wednesday evenings and 3 Sunday afternoons in December and features holiday activities for all ages: carriage rides, live entertainment, savory yuletide treats and libations, and of course, Father Christmas!

There is oh so much to see, hear, feast upon and experience at Victorian Christmas. Whether you’ve been naughty or nice…we look forward to welcoming the best of the holiday Season with you and yours!

Entertainment at Victorian Christmas

At locations throughout downtown, Victorian singers, bagpipers, brass bands and strolling minstrels provide warm Christmas music. Nevada City’s famous Walking Christmas Tree and a living nativity scene can be found, along with hot roasted chestnuts and horse drawn carriage rides.

Why not add to the party by dressing as a Victorian?

We’re encouraging people to dress up and add to the Victorian nature of the event. You’ll find costume tips and ideas costume tips and ideas here.”

First time U-Hauler

September 30th, 2016

First time U-Hauler….26fter……destruction  derby all over my gate…..gate lost

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The Fair is here!

August 10th, 2016

The fair is in town August 10-14th….Disabilities day is Friday….Get in free with a companion if you have a disability….Come on down and enjoy the fun and food! Information at; www.NevadaCountyFair.com 530-273-6217

Along Ride Alley

Along Ride Alley

Ferris Wheel

Few from top of the Farris Wheel

Few from top of the Farris Wheel

Summertime!

July 24th, 2016

Wonderful weather and a beautiful nature shot!

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Babies!

June 4th, 2016

Our Canadian Geese have hatched this years flock…They are so very cute!

 

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Merry Christmas!

December 24th, 2015

Have a wonderful Christmas…filled with  friends, family and love……and of course lots of wonderful food!

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Keep your fork…..

November 22nd, 2015

I believe the BEST is yet to come. and saying that. I hope you all have a blessed Thanksgiving and may GOD keep you and your Family safe.

Woman and the Fork….There was a young woman who had been diagnosed with a terminal illness and had been given three months to live. So as she was getting her things ‘in order,’ she contacted Her Pastor and had him come to her house to discuss certain aspects of her final wishes.
She told him which songs she wanted sung at the service, what scriptures she would like read, and what outfit she wanted to be buried in.
Everything was in order and the Pastor was preparing to leave when the young woman suddenly remembered something very important to her.
‘There’s one more thing,’ she said excitedly..

‘What’s that?’ came the Pastor’s reply?
‘This is very important,’ the young woman continued. ‘I want to be buried with a fork in my Right hand.’

The Pastor stood looking at the young woman, not knowing quite what to say.
That surprises you, doesn’t it?’ the young woman asked.
‘Well, to be honest, I’m puzzled by the request,’ said the Pastor.

The young woman explained. ‘My grandmother once told me this story, and from that time on I have always tried to pass along its message to those I love and those who are in need of encouragement. In all my years of attending socials and dinners, I always remember that when the dishes of the main course were being cleared, someone would inevitably lean over and say, ‘Keep your fork.’ It was my favorite part because I knew that something better was coming…like velvety chocolate cake or deep-dish apple pie. Something wonderful, and with substance!’
So, I just want people to see me there in that casket with a fork in my hand and I want them to wonder ‘What’s with the fork?’ Then I want you to tell them: ‘Keep your fork ..the best is yet to come.’

The Pastor’s eyes welled up with tears of joy as he hugged the young woman good-bye. He knew this would be one of the last times he would see her before her death. But he also knew that the young woman had a better grasp of heaven than he did. She had a better grasp of what heaven would be like than many people twice her age, with twice as much experience and knowledge. She KNEW that something better was coming.

At the funeral people were walking by the young woman’s casket and they saw the cloak she was wearing and the fork placed in her right hand. Over and over, the Pastor heard the question, ‘What’s with the fork?’ And over and over he smiled.

During his message, the Pastor told the people of the conversation he had with the young woman shortly before she died. He also told them about The fork and about what it symbolized to her. He told the people how he could not stop thinking about the fork and told them that they probably would not be able to stop thinking about it either.

He was right. So the next time you reach down for your fork let it remind you, ever so gently, that the best is yet to come.Friends are a very rare jewel,indeed.They make you smile and encourage you to succeed.Cherish the time you have,and the memories you share.Being friends with someone is not an opportunity, but a sweet responsibility.

Send this to everyone you consider a FRIEND…and I’ll bet this will be an Email they do remember, every time they pick up a fork! And just remember…keep your fork!
The BEST is yet to come!God Bless You

Thanksgiving at Plymouth

November 22nd, 2015

“In September 1620, a small ship called the Mayflower left Plymouth, England, carrying 102 passengers—an assortment of religious separatists seeking a new home where they could freely practice their faith and other individuals lured by the promise of prosperity and land ownership in the New World. After a treacherous and uncomfortable crossing that lasted 66 days, they dropped anchor near the tip of Cape Cod, far north of their intended destination at the mouth of the Hudson River. One month later, the Mayflower crossedMassachusetts Bay, where the Pilgrims, as they are now commonly known, began the work of establishing a village at Plymouth.

Throughout that first brutal winter, most of the colonists remained on board the ship, where they suffered from exposure, scurvy and outbreaks of contagious disease. Only half of the Mayflower’s original passengers and crew lived to see their first New England spring. In March, the remaining settlers moved ashore, where they received an astonishing visit from an Abenaki Indian who greeted them in English. Several days later, he returned with another Native American, Squanto, a member of the Pawtuxet tribe who had been kidnapped by an English sea captain and sold into slavery before escaping to London and returning to his homeland on an exploratory expedition. Squanto taught the Pilgrims, weakened by malnutrition and illness, how to cultivate corn, extract sap from maple trees, catch fish in the rivers and avoid poisonous plants. He also helped the settlers forge an alliance with the Wampanoag, a local tribe, which would endure for more than 50 years and tragically remains one of the sole examples of harmony between European colonists and Native Americans.

In November 1621, after the Pilgrims’ first corn harvest proved successful, Governor William Bradford organized a celebratory feast and invited a group of the fledgling colony’s Native American allies, including the Wampanoag chief Massasoit. Now remembered as American’s “first Thanksgiving”—although the Pilgrims themselves may not have used the term at the time—the festival lasted for three days. While no record exists of the historic banquet’s exact menu, the Pilgrim chronicler Edward Winslow wrote in his journal that Governor Bradford sent four men on a “fowling” mission in preparation for the event, and that the Wampanoag guests arrived bearing five deer. Historians have suggested that many of the dishes were likely prepared using traditional Native American spices and cooking methods. Because the Pilgrims had no oven and the Mayflower’s sugar supply had dwindled by the fall of 1621, the meal did not feature pies, cakes or other desserts, which have become a hallmark of contemporary celebrations.”